A beginner’s guide to window treatments

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April 12 at 7:00 AM

Until recently, I didn’t pay much attention to window treatments. My dad, who builds houses, doesn’t care for them, so we always had bare windows growing up. When I set out on my own, moving from apartment to apartment, I adopted whatever shades or blinds came with the place. It felt silly to invest in a rental. It wasn’t until I found my current apartment that I was finally forced to pause. Plastic vertical blinds? Seriously?

They were hideous, dated and out of place. They jangled with every breeze, offered next to no privacy and made my home feel like a seedy motel. Even worse, they were cut to four inches below the windowsill, leaving drag marks on the wall. They haunted me.

After two months, my boyfriend and I caved and hired a local company to replace them with neutral roller shades that silently disappeared into discreet valances and cast a golden glow on our plants when the sun set. The total investment, $600 for three large windows, was well worth it. A few weeks later, our neighbors hired a handyman on TaskRabbit to switch out their blinds, too. We wondered why changing them hadn’t occurred to us earlier.

“It’s sad to say, but window treatments are an afterthought,” says Kim Kiner, vice president of textiles and material design for Hunter Douglas. “They’re the last thing people think about because they’re not considered a necessity. Appliances are necessities. Window treatments are seen as dressing.” The story changes when people are faced with a pressing need, such as nosy neighbors or irritating sunbeams, she said. “You don’t think about them until you have to think about them.”

Amy Smith, a designer with Decorview, a national company that specializes in window treatments, understands why these projects can be stressful. There are many options, measurements are tricky, and costs run the gamut. “But ignoring them is a missed opportunity,” she said. “They can make a world of difference.”

There are two paths to revamping your windows: ordering custom treatments or shopping retail. Designers recommend the former because it cuts down on the risk of error, but you can go the DIY route if you’re on a budget. Retailers such as Lowe’s, Home Depot and J.C. Penney offer free in-home consultations and measurement assistance, and companies that specialize in window coverings, such as Next Day Blinds, 3 Day Blinds and Decorview, offer design guidance and repairs, too. Tim Hamilton, director of merchandising for Lowe’s, said 75 percent of windows are dressed in stock treatments. “I think you’d be pleasantly surprised at what you can get at value-driven retailers.”

No matter what your budget is, it helps to go in with a plan.

First, decide whether you want blinds, shades, shutters or curtains. “The better question is: What do you want to achieve?” Smith says. “Do you want privacy, light control or aesthetics?” Ian Gibbs, co-founder of the Shade Store, says it’s equally important to consider the room’s core function (if you’re designing a nursery, try blackout shades to ease daytime naps, for example) and the surrounding area. If you belong to a homeowners association, white shutters or blinds might be required.

Once you’ve answered the preliminary questions, get familiar with your options. Note that you can expect to tack on between $25 to $100 per window for professional installation of most window coverings, depending on the company.

Blinds

Blinds are generally the cheapest choice and are considered “hard” treatments because they’re made of metal or wood and arranged in slats. Stock vinyl and aluminum mini-blinds cost as little as $5 for a 2-by-4-foot window, making them a popular choice for rental apartments. But they don’t offer much in the way of style. “These are pure function,” said Jared Kelley, the blinds merchant for Home Depot in Atlanta. “They open, close and provide privacy.” He suggests upgrading to woven or faux wood blinds for a more architectural look.

Shades

Shades, or “soft” treatments, are a notch more expensive and made of fabric. Although they don’t allow for light-filtering adjustments like blinds, they come in varying levels of opacity. There are three main types of shades: roller, which pull down from a valance tube like wrapping paper; Roman, which cascade in elegant folds like drapery panels; and cellular or “honeycomb” shades, which are made of pleated chambers that trap air and provide insulation. The more layers, the more energy efficiency, Hamilton said, and solar cellular shades can save you up to 20 percent on your energy bill.

Vinyl roller shades can cost as little as $8 per window but typically range from $30 to $90, not including installation. Blackout options tend to be more expensive. Cellular and Roman shades cost about $50 to $100 per window.

Shutters

Shutters are the priciest option and lend the appearance of custom woodwork. Smith had them installed in her Ashburn, Va., home three years ago and said they’re great for curb appeal. Kiner agrees, noting that buyers often get the benefit of the manufacturer’s lifetime limited warranty. It’s best to have shutters fitted to your windows, but there are affordable stock options available for about $100 for a 3-by-3-foot square window. Allen + Roth shutters at Lowe’s range from about $40 to more than $200.

Curtains

Let’s face it: Curtain decisions can take guts. Fabric and pattern options can feel endless, and custom drapery panels often cost thousands of dollars. Ready-made curtains offer more warmth (and a lower price point) than hard window treatments, and measurements are relatively easy because you aren’t confined to the inside of the frame. Headings indicate how the top of the curtain is attached to the rod; pencil pleat and eyelet suit almost any style. Note that sunlight fades fabrics over time, so it’s smart to avoid rich-colored curtains in a bright room. And generally speaking, it’s best to have your curtains hover one inch above the floor. You may need to hem them to get the length just right. If you don’t have a sewing machine, try using fabric tape (there are plenty of tutorials online) or have them altered for about $15 per panel.

For a true budget option, check out Ikea, which sells curtains in pairs and often long lengths. For instance, a pair of cotton velvet Sanela curtains will run you $50 for 98-inch panels or $70 for 118-inch panels.

Before you make any decisions, spend some time browsing sites such as Pinterest and Houzz to familiarize yourself with each look, and take preliminary measurements. Hamilton says there’s no such thing as standard window sizes: “That’s an industry myth.”

And Kiner said the majority of windows aren’t even perfectly square. “Just yesterday I spoke with someone from our customer service department who said she’d just ordered new shades and got the measurements wrong,” she said. “This is someone who fields questions about that every day. When in doubt, call a professional. Better safe than sorry.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/a-beginners-guide-to-window-treatments/2017/04/11/2301483a-1ae2-11e7-855e-4824bbb5d748_story.html?utm_term=.ec44798da0e7

Determining the best window coverings

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Q) Hi Deb. I’m in a new home and wondering how I can determine the best window coverings for each room? The house feels empty without anything on the windows. What are the best ways to approach each room and determine the best options? Thanks!

A) Window treatments in a new home can be very important. They are a finishing touch that can make a room. In many cases it’s a combination of the style of the house, and functionality required, in terms of privacy and light control.

Window treatment options

There are many choices available in window treatments, such as drapery, blinds and shutters. There are also many material options like wood, fabrics, faux wood, etc. The most popular window coverings are drapery panels or blinds.

The space

In some homes, it makes sense to cover all the windows in one consistent type of treatment. For instance, this may be a blind or a shutter in one colour, that is used throughout the home. This adds light control and privacy to every room, and it gives your home a uniform look on the exterior.

Drapery vs. blinds

In some rooms, even with a blind, you may want to add drapery to soften the room or add some extra fullness. This might be in a living room or bedroom where you want additional style or decor — you can coordinate fabrics and textiles and really bring a room together. When you have more than one window in a room, like a living room, it’s important to give them the same coverings.

Style

The style of your home may also influence the window treatments; a more modern, sleek home may have fitted, streamlined, blinds. A traditional, formal home may have more ornate window treatment like blinds with full-length drapery, or customized roman shades to add pattern and colour to each room.

Tip: The more customized window treatments are more expensive and usually require a professional. When on a budget, look for inexpensive ready-made options that can be cut or fit to size to give a more custom feel.

Drapery vs. blinds

In some rooms, even with a blind, you may want to add drapery to soften the room or add some extra fullness. This might be in a living room or bedroom where you want additional style or decor — you can coordinate fabrics and textiles and really bring a room together. When you have more than one window in a room, like a living room, it’s important to give them the same coverings.

Style

The style of your home may also influence the window treatments; a more modern, sleek home may have fitted, streamlined, blinds. A traditional, formal home may have more ornate window treatment like blinds with full-length drapery, or customized roman shades to add pattern and colour to each room.

Tip: The more customized window treatments are more expensive and usually require a professional. When on a budget, look for inexpensive ready-made options that can be cut or fit to size to give a more custom feel.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/homesnews/1442873-determining-the-best-window-coverings

Playing toddler ‘went limp’ after being strangled by window blind cord in front of horrified mum

Karen Shelley, 42, thought her son had died when she saw him hang “in slow motion” as his eyes bulged and he lost colour in his face

A mother told how she watched her son “in slow motion” as he became entangled in a window blind cord and hung himself as he “went limp” before her eyes.

Karen Shelley, 42, was watching her son Riley, 2, play with his younger brother Louis, 1, when he became trapped with the cord around his neck.

She was at home in Sheerness, Kent, when Riley stood up on a windowsill and fell through the plastic cord.

His 16-year-old sister Sammy rushed to his aid and pulled him up to save him from hanging.

He was rushed to hospital where doctors ran tests to check his oxygen levels.

The little lad is now recovering at home, and the bruising on his neck has disappeared.

But his mum wants to remind other parents of the dangers of leaving a blind cord free – and said how “lucky” she is that her son is still alive.

Karen told how she ran in slow motion towards her son, as her legs “turned to jelly” and she collapsed on the sofa in front of him.

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The window blind cord as Karen would usually wrap it around the pole (Photo: Facebook)

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Riley hung for seconds from the window blind cord (Photo: Facebook)

She said: “It just happened so quickly. I honestly thought he was dead. My legs just collapsed under me as I crawled up the settee.

“He had hold of the cord on both sides of the loop and as he jumped down it went round his neck and pulled him back up a little – then he was just hanging there, limp.

“Sammy grabbed him, she got there before me and pulled him up.

“I just kept screaming ‘no, no, no, no’ – I thought he had died.

“His eyes started bulging out from his head and he turned this funny colour.

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Karen has cut the cord off and is warning other parents of the dangers (Photo: SWNS)

“It’s amazing how quickly the colour went, it only took two or three seconds and he was completely pale.

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She was told that if the cord was lower, it could have been a fatal accident (Photo: Facebook)

Karen, who is also mum to 22-year-old Luke, told how she usually wraps the cord of her second-hand blind around the top of the pole.

The teacher’s assistant was aware of the risk of accidents around her children and said that morning, she had forgotten to wrap it around.

Karen said: “It’s so dangerous. It goes to show it only takes one day for something like this to happen.

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Karen Shelley with son Riley Stuart (Photo: SWNS)

“I’ve been so lucky and I know I was lucky. I just feel so sorry for the parents that have lost their children in this way.

“I did cut the cord in half but I can’t bear looking at it anymore so I cut it all off.”

Karen wants to raise awareness of the dangers of using blinds with a cord pull.

She said she wanted to share Riley’s story so that other parents will think before leaving their cord dangling free.

Karen said: “It just show how easily it can happen. I was 12 feet away from Riley but if my child was out of the room, it could have ended differently.

“If the cord was a few inches longer, it could have ended differently. We might not have been so lucky.”

This comes as another toddler was caught on camera silently strangling on a window blind cord as his mother filmed the rest of the family playing together in the living room.

Gavin Walla, from Wisconsin, US, can be seen in the horrifying home video hanging limply from the looped window blind cord, which is wrapped around his neck.

Gavin’s mother was filming a home video of her children playing together in their front room when she suddenly notices the toddler has stopped breathing.

Immediately, she drops the camera, screaming her son’s name as she desperately tries to untangle the cord.

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Horror: Gavin stands limply in the corner (Photo: ABC)

Thankfully, her quick actions saved Gavin’s life and he’s heard in the video coughing and spluttering as he gasps for breath.

Gavin, who is now 17, wants people to see his home video in the hope of raising awareness about the very real dangers of window blind cords.

He told ABC News: “I’m glad that it’s out there. It saved the lives of other children that have been fortunate enough to have parents who have seen the video.”

It is thought more than 100 children have died in window blind cord accidents since Gavin’s.

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Now: Gavin wants his home video to serve as a warning to other parents (Photo: ABC)

Elliot Kaye, chairman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission told ABC: “I see decades, and I’m talking decades, about children once a month getting hanged to death by these products and it’s got to stop.”

The government first identify the window blinds as a hidden danger over 30 years ago.

But the cords remain a potentially deadly hazard to this day with many manufacturers still using them on many of their products.

IKEA and Target have already removed corded window blinds from their shelves due to safety concerns.

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Family: The Walla family want to share their story (Photo: ABC)

Walmart and several other stores have announced they will stop selling the products by 2018.

Ralph Vasami, the head of the Window Covering Association, an industry trade group, admitted that the hazard is still present but has been reduced by new safety features including breakaway cords and string that can be tied at a height children can’t reach.

They however do not recommend that corded window blinds should be used in homes with children.

 

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/playing-toddler-strangled-window-blind-9363464

 

Innovation awards: Bloc Blinds gives new life to roller blinds

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Anyone who has ever had roller blinds installed in their home will be aware of the problems that arise when they start to age. You can’t really take them down to wash them and the only solution for worn or discoloured blinds is to replace the complete unit.

But you can’t just do it for one window, the whole house needs to be done at considerable expense.

Changing the blinds themselves isn’t an option either, the whole mechanical assembly for each one must be replaced as well.

A simpler and much more cost-effective solution is now at hand thanks to an invention by Belfast based Bloc Blinds. The company is responsible for a number of patented and patent-pending products since breaking into the window blinds market but its most striking innovation is the fabric changing roller blind.

This clever design allows the user to swap the fabric of the blind as often as they like without replacing or even removing the complete system from the window.

The barrel, fixtures and fittings of the blind all remain in situ, only the fabric is changed.

This has considerable advantages beyond simple cost savings as Bloc Blinds marketing manager Kiera Scullion explains.

“The ease with which fabrics can be swapped means that consumers no longer need to think of their blinds as stagnant pieces in their room which can only be of neutral colour so as to match all possible colours schemes over the coming years,” she says.

“This means that consumers can be as daring as they like with their colour and pattern choices, safe in the knowledge that if they redecorate or have a change of heart down the line the fabric can be quickly and inexpensively swapped.”

As well as increased design flexibility there is also the practical element with the option to replace tired or worn fabrics as needed without replacing all the other elements of the blind which are still perfectly functional. “The components used to build our blinds are extremely hard wearing so that they will last for many years, and fabric changes to come,” she adds.

The blind has been designed with simplicity in mind. Users can swap the fabric of their blinds in seconds by simply hooking off one and hooking on another.

“The re-ordering process has also been simplified. By scanning the QR code on the barrel of the blind the customer is taken to the reorder page on the Bloc Blinds website.

“The measurements from their original order are already stored so all the customer has to do is choose a fabric and wait for it to be sent out to them ready to be hooked into place.

The blind’s origins date back some years to when Cormac Diamond, inventor of the fabric changing roller blind, was working in Poland for window manufacturing firm. He realised that there was a gap for high quality and visually appealing blinds.

Easily interchangeable

“As a solution to this gap, you could say the ‘lightbulb’ moment came when he looked at other household items which were easily interchangeable such as printer cartridges and razor blades,” says Scullion.

“Cormac wanted to offer this same level of flexibility to window blinds and as a result move them into the home accessories market.”

The blind was launched in 2014 and was quickly picked up by the John Lewis Partnership. It is currently available as a category brand product throughout its nationwide network of stores in the UK and on its online platform. It is also available and selling well throughout Europe and has recently been launched on the US market.

“It has been really well received with 10 per cent of customers reordering fabrics to date as well as several recognitions for design innovation both in the consumer and trade sectors,” Scullion says.

“Given that it is an environmentally friendlier option which reduces the amount of aluminium going to landfills, the fabric changing roller blind has been particularly well received by the public sector as well as environmentally and sustainability aware consumers.”

Founded in 2006, Bloc Blinds originally manufactured skylight blinds, with a handful of people in Diamond’s father-in-law’s shed.

“We have come quite a way since then with over 100 employees and a recent move into our new, custom-built factory,” she says. “We now design and manufacture a wide range of award-winning window dressing options and deliver them all over the world.”

Continued growth is very much on the agenda for the future. A new factory was completed at the beginning of this year and the company is engaged in an ongoing recruitment drive to increase staff numbers by nearly 50 per cent over the next two years.

“We have worked hard to expand our retailer network in the UK and Irelandand will continue to do so in the coming years. We have recently opened our first office in the US, in Boston, to service our US website and customer base.

“We hope to increase consumer sales as well as exploring long-term growth plans in the market. The overall goal is to increase the number of our products in the market so that we can subsequently increase repeat fabric sales.”

BARRY McCALL

http://www.irishtimes.com/business/innovation-awards-bloc-blinds-gives-new-life-to-roller-blinds-1.2728306

Toddler Tianna Mooney died after getting tangled in blind, just 45 minutes after she was put to bed .

 

 

PARENTS are being warned about the dangers posed by window blind cords after the death of an 18-month-old girl.

Little Tianna Mooney died after becoming entangled in a blind in her bedroom.

The toddler had been put to bed as normal at her Basford home.

But less than an hour later her mother, Stacey Clarke, found her unresponsive, with the cord loop around her neck.

 

Now – after finding Tianna’s death in June last year was accidental – assistant coroner David James said he was ‘astounded’ to discover how many children have died in similar circumstances.

Read more: Parents of Bronwyn Taylor raise money for awareness leaflets

He said: “Tianna’s death was not an isolated death. I can’t say enough how important it is for parents, grandparents and carers of young children to ensure looped blind cords are kept out of the reach of children.

“This was an utter tragedy.”

An inquest at North Staffordshire Coroners’ Court yesterday heard Miss Clarke put Tianna to bed at around 7.30pm on June 16 last year.

The tot’s cot was by a window fitted with a vertical blind – which had some slats missing – and she would often stand and look out of the window before settling down to sleep. The inquest heard Miss Clarke, who lived in Victoria Street with Tianna and her older son, went upstairs 45 minutes later.

She described seeing Tianna ‘standing in her cot, with the cord around her neck’.

Read more: Hundreds attend funeral of Bronwyn Taylor who died after getting tangled in blinds

Miss Clarke picked up her daughter and ran outside calling for help. One neighbour called an ambulance while another – a teacher – tried to resuscitate Tianna. Paramedics quickly arrived but the toddler was pronounced dead in hospital.

Pathologists concluded Tianna died from ‘compression of the neck, consistent with hanging’.

The inquest comes three months after 16-month-old Bronwyn Taylor died when she became entangled in her grandparents’ window blinds in Fegg Hayes.

Her parents Matt and Cathy, from Basford, have since launched a campaign to raise awareness of hidden dangers in the home which will see thousands of leaflets distributed to new parents, as well as extended family members such as grandparents, and in libraries, nurseries, doctors and dental surgeries.

Matt, aged 41, said: “It is tragic that this has happened to another little girl. There are lots of accidents happening every day, which is why we are campaigning and getting these leaflets out.”

The inquest heard current blind cord standards ensure new blinds are child-safe, but older blinds remain a danger in many homes.

During the inquest, Mr James said: “Although these standards are there now for new installations, many homes are still fitted with blinds that will not incorporate these requirements.

“Children of this age are prone not to be able to free themselves, and their windpipes are not fully developed, which means they suffocate.”

Read more: Tragedy as little girl dies after getting tangled in blinds

 

Read more: http://www.stokesentinel.co.uk/toddler-tianna-mooney-died-after-getting-tangled-in-blinds-just-45-minutes-after-she-was-put-to-bed/story-29509961-detail/story.html#ixzz4EQ4k6PLU
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THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO CLEAN WINDOW BLINDS

Blinds. There is no quicker or more effective way to switch from natural light to privacy please! Just a twist of the wrist and the magic happens. Surely, this is why just about every window in just about every house and apartment in the U.S. comes dressed with BLINDS. We have come to expect them. We have come to depend on them. Curtains and the like are just decorative bonuses; blinds do the grunt work.

But speaking of work, they sure are a lot of work to clean. Blinds collect dust like nobody’s business, and getting that dust off is a pain. It is time consuming, and I know I’ve never felt like I’ve gotten minecompletely dust-free–even after a day devoted to cleaning them.

Well, that was before I knew THIS awesome hack. The only hack you’ll ever need for cleaning your blinds. Are you ready? Let’s figure out how to clean window blinds together!

how to clean your window blinds

(This post contains affiliate links that support this blog.)

Here are the things you’ll need: tongs, two microfiber dust cloths (you may want to have some extra for swapping out when the originals get dusty), and four rubber bands.

Let’s go to work!

Wrap your dust cloths around each side of your tongs and secure with two rubber bands a piece. Make sure that the smooth side of the dust cloth faces in and the seam is on the side or back for the most effective dusting.

Clasp your tongs around each individual blind and just LOOK at all of the dust that comes back! This is seriously the most efficient way anyone has ever cleaned their blinds. Ever.

If your dry cloths aren’t getting the job done, spray your favorite cleaner on the blinds as you go. We love making our own and use these DIY household cleaner recipes on this list to do it!

Now, if your blinds are anything like mine, you’ll need to change your microfiber cloths out a few times over before you’re done. Just do it, you’re still saving mad amounts of time by using this hack!

clean your window blinds with kitchen tongs

I appreciate that this method doesn’t require me to donate my favorite pair of tongs to the cleaning closet either. Just remove the cloths when you’re done, send the tongs through the dishwasher, and they’re ready to hang out with the kitchen utensils once again.

So, happy cleaning, friends! We’d love to hear how it goes for you in the comments!

SLIDING PANELS, SLIDING PANEL BLINDS, PANEL BLINDS, PANEL CURTAINS, PANEL GLIDE BLINDS, GLIDING WINDOW PANELS,…

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Honeycomb blinds keeping homes well insulated and energy efficient

Blinds and window covers specialist AustralianWindowCovering explains how the right window treatment can keep a home well insulated while also saving energy for the homeowner.

Energy-efficient window treatments such as honeycomb blinds are designed to address both functional and aesthetic objectives, making them a popular choice in the window decoration market. As energy cost continues to rise, homeowners can use solutions such as honeycomb blinds to increase energy efficiency.

Honeycomb blinds are high on visual appeal with their attractive contemporary looks. Stylish aesthetic apart, honeycomb blinds are also good insulators. Only the white side is visible from the outside, helping achieve a uniform appearance regardless of the colour chosen for the interior.

Honeycomb blinds are available in almost any colour with the fabric supplied in metallic or semi-transparent options. Blinds can also be customised to suit specific window applications. There are blinds that offer only the minimum emittance or partial light, while others provide complete blackout. For blinds that can be lowered to the glass, the ultra-thin version would be perfect.

Interior designers prefer honeycomb blinds mainly for their aesthetic appearance and function. These blinds can be used to control light in a room. Honeycomb blinds are available in many colours as well as models including vertical blinds, cellular blinds and blackout blinds.

 

http://www.architectureanddesign.com.au/suppliers/australianwindowcovering/honeycomb-blinds-keeping-homes-well-insulated-and

Sixteen-month-old girl died in ‘freak accident’ after getting tangled in cord of her grandparents’ window blinds

  • 16-month-old girl Bronwyn Taylor got tangled in a cord of window blinds
  • She had been playing in the conservatory of her grandparents’ house
  • It is understood Bronwyn had been left alone for just a matter of moments 
  • Her parents Matthew and Cathy Taylor were out at the theatre at the time 
  • They urged other families to install safety devices to all curtain cords 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3526089/Sixteen-month-old-girl-died-freak-accident-getting-tangled-cord-grandparents-window-blinds.html#ixzz457xJbRZu
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 

32E430C400000578-0-image-a-2_1459935659008A 16-month-old girl died in a ‘freak accident’ after getting tangled in a cord of her grandparents’ window blinds.

Bronwyn Taylor was found unconscious tangled in the cord on Saturday.

The little girl was taken to hospital but never recovered.

She had been at her grandparents’ as her parents Matthew, 40, and Cathy, 42, had gone to the theatre to watch Chitty Chitty Bang Bang with their two other sons.

Her devastated parents, who lost a baby girl Megan in 2013 who was stillborn, have now paid tribute to their ‘little star’ and urged other parents to safety-proof their homes following the tragic accident.

Since 1999, 28 children in the UK have died after becoming tangled in blind cords.

In 2014, new European standards were introduced following a campaign by a mother whose baby daughter died after an accident involving a blind.

The standards make it a requirement that new blinds must be safe or supplied with appropriate child safety devices.

But the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) estimates there are still as many as 200 million existing blinds across the UK that may not comply with the new standards.

Bronwyn’s mother, Cathy Taylor, said: ‘This accident shouldn’t have happened and the blinds shouldn’t have been there. Everybody with small children needs to check and make sure they have safety blinds.

‘Bronwyn’s grandparents absolutely adored her. She was only left alone for a few seconds. It’s just absolutely tragic.’

16-month-old girl Bronwyn Taylor died in a ‘freak accident’ after becoming entangled in the metal cord of her grandparents’ window blinds

Mr Taylor, who runs a heating engineering firm in Basford, Staffordshire, said: ‘Our whole world has been blown apart. Parents should never have to bury their child.

‘My mum and dad have been blaming themselves but we don’t blame them. It was a freak accident. We are all devastated.

‘She was adored by everyone. So many people would come over to her wherever we were and say hello. Bronwyn was a little star.’

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Matthew Taylor said his family had been ripped apart by the tragedy (pictured from left to right: Bronwyn, Owen, 10, Boden, 16, Dylan, 10)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It is understood Bronwyn had been left alone for just a matter of moments when the tragedy occurred

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

32E7BEE700000578-3526089-image-a-17_1459956013556 Father Matthew, Dylan, Cathy, Owen and Boden pictured today following Saturday’s tragic accident

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew and Cathy had taken their other two sons, Dylan, 10, and Owen, 10, who are from different relationships, to the theatre on the day of the accident.

It meant Bronwyn was at the home of her grandparents, Shirley and Barry Taylor, and was being cared for by her grandmother the time of the accident.

Mrs Taylor, 66, is also a registered carer for Bronwyn’s brother Boden, 16, who has cerebral palsy.

She only left the toddler for a matter of seconds when the tragedy occurred.

Bronwyn’s grandmother found the little girl already in cardiac arrest. Paramedics were called to the couple’s home, in Fegg Hayes, Stoke-on-Trent at around 3.30pm.

But Bronwyn never regained consciousness and was pronounced dead at the Royal Stoke University Hospital.

Her grandfather, 79, collapsed in shock after the incident and remains in hospital where there are concerns for his physical and mental health.

Bronwyn’s mother, from Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffs, said: ‘Fate was against her. A lot of older grandchildren are usually there in the room but none of the grandchildren were around that day.

‘She blames herself but she shouldn’t at all. We want to raise awareness of the dangers of blinds and their cords when you have small children. We want people to be aware her death was not in vain.’

Mr Taylor added: ‘My dad, who is 80 next month, went upstairs for a nap and my mum had the kids downstairs.

‘Bronwyn had been playing on the slide in the garden and went into the conservatory to play with a little toy hoover.

‘We don’t know exactly what happened but somehow she got the blinds, which were on a shelf above the floor, wrapped around her neck.

‘Either the blind cord came down or Bronwyn reached up and knocked it down, we just don’t know.

‘My mum was probably looking after Boden and had her back turned for a matter of minutes. It was an accident but we are so keen to warn other people of the dangers.

‘If anything can come out of this it must be to warn other people to put safety catches on their blinds.

‘We just want something to come from this. We can’t let what happened to be in vain.

‘Life is so precious and people must make sure their surroundings are safe as best they can.

‘But it is not just about blinds, it could happen with anything. People must make sure everything is child-proof as much as they can.

‘If they have old blinds they must double check the cords are tied away or replace them with safety blinds.’

DANGERS OF BLIND CORDS

 

The new rules relating to blind cords were introduced following a spate of deaths of young children. They state that blinds have a snap-mechanism when more than 4kg is applied.

According to RoSPA, in the UK between 1999 and 2013 there were 28 deaths linked to blind cords, with 15 of those since 2010 alone.

But the charity believes there may have also been many more ‘near misses’.

Children under the age of five are said to be most at risk from blind cords. It is estimated that it can take as little as 18 seconds for a toddler to lose their life after becoming entangled in a window blind cord or chain.

In 2013, Sophia Parslow died aged 17 months after accidentally hanging herself on the blind cord in her family’s living room.

Following her death, her devastated mother Amanda O’Halloran, from Gloucestershire, started a campaign for the design of blinds to be outlawed to prevent a similar fate befalling other children and launched Sophia’s Cause.

In February last year, 13-month-old Johnny Doran died after an accident involving a blind cord. He was found suspended above the ground next to the window by his father Martin, 35, when he walked into the room.

Mr Doran tried to resuscitate his son before ambulance crews arrived and took him to Oxford’s John Radcliffe Hospital. But the toddler never regained consciousness.

Last November, a boy of three accidentally strangled himself with a Venetian blind cord while playing at his home. Haseeb Javaid was found hanging by mum Saima Bi, 29. She took him into the street and screamed for help.

But despite the efforts of passers-by and paramedics in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, he died three days later as a result of a brain injury.

RoSPA recommends that parents install blinds which do not have a cord, particularly in a child’s bedroom and that a child’s cot, bed, playpen or highchair are not near a window.

Pull cords on curtains and blinds should be kept short and out of reach of children, the charity advises.

Last year, Swedish furniture giant Ikea said it would no longer sell window blinds with cords. In February, Homebase recalled ‘dangerous’ bamboo blinds over fears children could strangle themselves on them.

32E51B4700000578-3526089-image-a-34_1459937297676Following the tragedy, Mrs Taylor said: ‘Our world has been blown apart and will never be the same again’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bronwyn’s devastated parents hope her death will serve as a warning to others to put safety catches on their blinds and have urged people to make everything in their house as ‘child-proof’ as they can

 

 

 

 

 

 

Matthew and Cathy were informed of the horrific news when police officers met them at the theatre on Saturday afternoon.

Mrs Taylor said: ‘The light in the middle of our family has gone out. Bronwyn was so precious and had her whole life ahead of her.

‘She was a perfectly healthy and beautiful little girl and her life has been taken away from her.

‘I was looking forward to watching all the Disney films with her, dress her up like a princess and do her hair. That’s gone because of a stupid little accident.’

Staffordshire Police are preparing a report into Bronwyn’s death.

A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokesman said: ‘Our crews found a baby girl in cardiac arrest.

‘Sadly, despite the best efforts of ambulance staff, doctors and hospital medics nothing could be done to save the girl and she was confirmed dead at hospital.’

Bronwyn had recently started at Southlands Nursery in Newcastle-under-Lyme.

A spokesman said: ‘Bronwyn was like a breath of fresh air. She was a beautiful little girl who responded positively to everyone in our nursery.

‘She was one of the easiest children we have integrated into our nursery due to her lovely, easy-going temperament. Although she was with us for such a short time, our memories of her will remain with us forever.’

32E4E5C000000578-3526089-image-m-25_1459935968156Paramedics found the tot in cardiac arrest after being called to the house in Stoke-on-Trent on Saturday

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3526089/Sixteen-month-old-girl-died-freak-accident-getting-tangled-cord-grandparents-window-blinds.html#ixzz4581ED0my
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Success for Sophia’s Cause campaign: Ikea to stop selling blinds with cords

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Swedish furniture giant Ikea has said it will no longer sell window blinds with cords.

Cords from blinds have been associated with the deaths of young children, including Gloucestershire’s Sophia Parslow, through strangulation.

Sophia’s mum Amanda O’Halloran, from Tirley, was left devastated when her 17-month-old daughter died by accidentally hanging herself on the blind cord in her living room in June 2013.

Since then Amanda has campaigned tirelessly for the design of blinds to be outlawed to prevent a similar fate befalling other children, launching Sophia’s Cause.

In a statement, Ikea, which has a store in Bristol, said: “Product safety is the highest priority for IKEA, which is why we have been working to develop alternative solutions to exposed cords in window coverings.

“IKEA is committed to working together with our customers to raise awareness of this important issue and to help families get the knowledge they need to ensure a safer everyday life at home.”

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents welcomed the move, saying it hopes other retailers will also stop selling products with cords because of the risk of strangulation.

It says at least 27 todders have died as a result of blind cords and chains between 1999 and 2014.

Sheila Merrill, RoSPA’s public health adviser, said: “This is fantastic news. Not only will it help to save many lives but it is an important step forward for the blind cord industry. It is encouraging to see such a well-known furniture retailer taking the necessary steps to help prevent further tragedies.

“Any move that reduces the risk to children is a move in the right direction. Too many lives have been needlessly affected by the dangers of looped blind cords, which is why we called upon the blind industry to take voluntary action to reduce the risk.

“We hope that other major retail stores will make the same promise as IKEA to stop selling window blinds with cords.”

Research indicates that most accidental deaths involving blind cords happen in the bedroom to children between 16 months and 36 months old, with the majority (more than half) happening at about 23 months.

To reduce the risk posed by looped blind cords, RoSPA’s advice is:

 

  • Install blinds that do not have a cord, particularly in a child’s bedroom
  • Do not place a child’s cot, bed, playpen or highchair near a window
  • Pull cords on curtains and blinds should be kept short and kept out of reach
  • Tie up the cords or use one of the many cleats, cord tidies, clips or ties that are available
  • Do not hang toys or objects that could be a hazard on the cot or bed
  • Don’t hang drawstring bags where a small child could get their head through the loop of the drawstring.

Read more: http://www.gloucestershireecho.co.uk/Success-Sophia-s-Cause-campaign-Ikea-stop-selling/story-27933606-detail/story.html#ixzz3nrlcLhPA

 

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